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Knoitall University

This classroom will provide you with resources that will help you set up your own Knoitall classroom, either for yourself or your organization.  Anyone can share or sell what they know through Knoitall and learn from others.  Topics covered include:

  1. Setting up your Knoitall classroom
  2. Creating your first learning post
  3. How to sell your time
  4. Getting paid
  5. Building your brand through Knoitall
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  1. Discover the steps to prepare your landscape for a successful conversion to California Natives
  2. Build a landscape and irrigation plan to support California Native Landscaping
  3. Create a plant list and source it to the best nurseries
Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Adult
"Yankee Point Ceanothus"

Are you ready to take the plunge and move to a beautiful, low maintenance California landscape?  Attract hundreds of native bird species, beneficial insects and other wildlife.  Here are some of the things I have learned in converting my landscape to a primarily native pallette:

  1. Natives don't play well with other plants.  This is due to a variety of factors, but some of the key ones are a) the growth habits of natives, which don't match most non-native species (natives go dormant in the heat of summer when many other plants are continuing their growth habits); b) the water needs of natives, which are far lower than even the most drought tolerant species you may have growing in your landscape; and c) once established, natives will overtake non-native species.  After all, they were designed to thrive in your environment...they were here long before we brought in exotics from places like South Africa, and they'll be here long after the others have died away.
  2. Natives have a completely different growing pattern from most other plants.  The key take away for all of us is to learn patience on this front.  Some of the biggest natives may spend their first 2-3 years in, what appears to be, a dormant state.  However, what you don't see is what is going on below the plant.  Natives are sending their roots deep into the soil because they are designed to maximize any moisture that is available to support them through the warm months. I have planted natives that seemed to be doing nothing for 2 years, leading to disappointment as I continue to weed around their base and reapply mulch to areas that I felt should have been washed over with foliage.  And then, BAM! The growth above ground begins and you can see 3-4 feet of expansion in a single season.  Not all natives follow this schedule.  The various forms of salvia, for example, like the Cleavandii here will experience solid growth within the first year.
Salvia Cleavandii
  1. Irrigation strategies have to change. First off, although most of us are used to drip irrigation as a way to conserve water, this is a "no go" for natives.  I'm not exactly sure why, but delivering a single stream of water to a single point at the root base seems to kill natives at an alarming rate.  Any watering in summer, even when natives appear listless, can also lead to a high level of death.  The absolute best strategy I have found for planting natives is to wait until the day of a major rain event, and then get as many into the ground as possible on that day.  I have close to 100% success rate when employing this strategy.  Short of that, I recommend a deep (and I mean deep) watering the first time you put the plant in the ground, and then repeat that 7 days later, and the...NOTHING!  No more water until the next rains come.
  2. Planting strategies have to change. Along with the message above regarding irrigation, there are a few key rules associated with planting natives.  First, the time of year.  I have found that the best time of year is whenever there is a natural rain event.  That could be in early winter, late winter, or into the spring.  As long as there's rain, it's a good time to plant natives. But the idea that you plant perennials in the fall in So Cal doesn't work with natives.  I have found that you will usually over water them or under water them at this time of year.  Too much water, and the warm soil will kill the roots.  Too little water, same result.  Second, how you plant natives is very important.  You want to get the native plant connected with you native soil right away.  That means that you dig your hole to the dimensions of the container the plant is in, and you don't add any amendments. Just dig a hole the size of the plant and get it into that native soil...then let the rain do its thing or water the heck out of it.
Deer Grass
Gorilla Hair
  1. Mulch, and the right type of mulch is key to successful growth. Whatever money you saved in amendments will be spent on mulch.  I strongly recommend Gorilla Hair, as this mulch tends to retain water better than other mulches, and it lasts longer as well.  It is basically a redwood fabric-like blend that stays put, cools the soil and retains moisture exceptionally well.
  2. A plant list that matches your location is key to successful native introduction and growth.  There are specific native zones in California that match the microclimates of this diverse State.  Before investing in native plants, make sure you understand your micro climate and that you match native plants to the area in which you live.  You will save a lot of heart ache and head aches by doing this before you get started.  I happen to be in a "coastal sage scrub" zone.  Plants that live naturally in this zone thrive in my yard.  Buy plants that live natively outside this zone, and they will struggle...some never growing more than a few inches outside the size you purchased.  One way to understand the plants that live into your zone is to get outside into a native area and look around.  You'll see what grows naturally in your zone.  Take some pictures and bring them with you to the nursery.  Match the photos to the plants you see.  Make sure there's a match with the leaves.  Then start planting!
  3. Some natives live a short life, some seem to live forever. It's a sad fact that some of my favorite natives, in particular various strains of Ceanothus, don't live past a few years.  I've planted hundreds of Ceanothus over the 20 years I've lived on my property, and none are left from the original planting.  Most live 6-7 years, some shorter, some longer.  They are absolutely gorgeous in Spring with their bright blue flowers, but don't invest too much emotionally.  One day you'll walk out into the yard and see one brown branch on the total plant.  Guess what?  It's completely dead and it doesn't even know it yet.  In a couple of weeks the entire plant is brown.  So get used to replanting every couple of years so that you always have a few in various stages of growth.  They are one of the great foundational native plants for any home landscape.
Ceanothus "Ray Hartman"
  1. Water natives at your own peril. After the first couple of deep waterings with a hose, most natives are set.  If you continue to water them through the summer months, you'll kill them with kindness.  Their internal clocks know that there's no rain in summer in California, so they go dormant.  This is how they are able to survive with the infrequent rainfall produced in our great state.  Yes, they will look strained.  That's ok.  A quick spray on the leaves is ok, but KEEP THE WATER AWAY FROM THE ROOTS.  The roots will rot and you'll be digging up a plant that never should have died.

So these are my recommendations.  Happy planting!

 

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  1. Discover the steps to prepare your landscape for a successful conversion to California Natives
  2. I'll help you build a landscape and irrigation plan to support California Native Landscaping
  3. I'll help you create a plant list and source it to the best nurseries
$100.00
2 session(s)  1 Hours
Online - Tutoring or Individual Lessons
Adult

Are you ready to take the plunge and move to a beautiful, low maintenance California landscape?  Attract hundreds of native bird species, beneficial insects and other wildlife.  I'll help you put together a plan for success that includes;

  1. Preparing your landscape to accept native plants
  2. An irrigation and ground cover plan to support the early growth of your natives (the beauty is that this irrigation is temporary. As soon as your plants take root you'll be relying on rainfall to maintain your healthy natives)
  3. A plant list to include the types of plants you are considering for your yard, from shrubs, to flowers, ground covers and trees

I will meet with you through Skype for 2 sessions of one hour each.  You would pay a landscape architect hundreds of dollars for the knowledge you will obtain in these (2) one-hour sessions.

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$ 100.00

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  1. Create your classroom
  2. Set Up Payment tools to get paid
  3. Add locations where you hold classes and instructors who teach your classes
  4. Learn how to promote your Knoitall classroom
$0.00
1 session(s)  1 Hours
Online - Class or Webinar
Teen, Adult

We will cover all of the topics above in this one-hour session, delivered through gotomeeting.

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  1. Learn how to fill your classroom with content you've already created
  2. Learn how Knoitall uses this content to increase you exposure on the platform
Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Child, Pre-teen, Teen, Adult

OK, so you've just joined the Knoitall community and we've given you a classroom.  If you're new to the platform, you're probably asking yourself, "What am I supposed to do with a classroom?", or, better yet, "What is a Knoitall classroom?  I've never taught anything in my life."  That's what most of us say when we join Knoitall for the first time.

Knoitall Rule #1:  Everybody has something they know that can be shared or sold to others

This is fundamental to why we created Knoitall as the world's first learning network.  We believe every learner is also a budding teacher, and vice versa.  

Knoitall Rule #2: The reality is that you probably have already created learning content that could teach others, and you don't even know it.

Have you ever written a blog about something? Have you ever created a power point presentation and posted it to SlideShare?  Have you ever created a YouTube video to show others how to do something?  These are all various forms of learning content that you should bring into your Knoitall classroom.  

The first step towards building a successful classroom at Knoitall is to tag all of your existing learning content.  All you need is the URL for the content, and we'll place it into an iFrame on Knoitall so that it can be shared with others.  It's easy and takes a minute or less:

  1. Find your existing content.
  2. Click the "Teach" link and select "Learning Post".
  3. Identify the learning outcomes associated with the content you've created.  "What will I learn if I watch your video, read your blog post or view your SlideShare presentation?
  4. Describe the item you're linking to.
  5. Tag it to our Categories so that it can be shared in other user's feeds.
  6. Make sure to enter the External Link or URL to the item so that we can place it in the iFrame.

Thats it!  In 15 minutes you can have 15 pieces of learning content in your classroom available to others in the network.  

And here's the beauty of Knoitall...this content is never deleted unless you want it to be.  It stays in your classroom forever and gets distributed into the learning feeds of new members who are interested in the topics you cover.  

So, grab your favorite beverage, click the "Teach" button, and get started. By the time you're done, you'll have a classroom full of content that can educate others.

 

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  1. Learn about the power of republishing existing learning posts
  2. Learn how you can increase your audience by republishing
Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Pre-teen, Teen, Adult

So, you've created a great learning post and it's gone out to others in the Knoitall community who have chosen to follow you.  That's great, both for them, and for you.  But what about new members who join Knoitall in the future and choose to follow you?  

The way the Knoitall feed works is to place a priority on the most current posts and bring those to the top of the learning feed.  And that's why the most active users on Knoitall update and re-post their existing learning posts on Knoitall.  By simply editing an existing post, and re-publishing, Knoitall will treat it as a new learning post and bring it to the top of your followers' feeds.  

If you want to make updates to your existing posts to bring them current, that's great.  I'm sure you're audience will appreciate this.  But re-publishing is one way that Knoitall is unique from other social networks.  We understand that learning has a much longer shelf life than a Facebook post or a tweet, and so we store all of your existing items in your Knoitall classroom.  At any time in the future, you can go back, edit an existing item, and republish.  It's an easy way for you to stay current and in touch with your Knoitall followers.

Now go out there and educate your world!

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  1. How is a learning feed different from other social feeds?
  2. What is a learning pathway and how can I create one with my own content?
  3. How is a pathway delivered through my followers' feeds?
Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Pre-teen, Teen, Adult

As founder of Knoitall I’m often asked about our learning feed and what makes it different from other social networks like Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest.

Although the technology behind the feed is similar (comment, like, share), etc., there are two areas of difference that I would like to focus on in this learning post.  The first pertains to differences between learning itself, and the differences between learning content and other forms of social content.  The second pertains to how learning is tagged and delivered through our feed.

Learning Content is Different

Learning content is different from other types of social content in a number of ways, all of which are reflected in how Knoitall preserves your content and how that content is represented to the user.  Here are some of the fundamental differences:

Learning has a longer shelf life than other types of social content.  Twitter, for example, being first and foremost a news platform, has a very short shelf life for content.  Usually within 24 hours the content is obsolete.  This sort of content plays well on the Twitter platform, which focuses on small bursts of information distributed to a wide audience of followers and potential followers.  Facebook, being a blend between your friends news and other outside news organizations, has a slightly longer shelf life, but it is still limited.  Learning content, on the other hand, has a far longer shelf life than other types of social content.  Knoitall has attempted to blend a social platform for learning in a way that supports content with a longer shelf life.  We do this by:

  1. Saving your listings in a digital classroom where the items can be accessed, updated, and reposted.
  2. Giving you the ability to package this content into a learning pathway, which is a grouping of items into a chronology that reflects the learning outcomes you want to achieve for your audience.  So, for example, if you want to help teach your audience about global climate change, you may want to organize your existing learning posts into an order of delivery that starts with an introduction to climate change, the history of earth's climate, and then a look at what the science tells us today.  Once a pathway of learning items is created, the items are then delivered to your audience through their knoitall feeds in the order you have placed them into the pathway.

Learning Posts are Different

We make it very easy to create a learning post so that you can share what you know with your followers.  You have the ability to create new content, or tag existing content, like you would in a Tweet or Facebook post.  There are, however, some parameters that must be met in order for content to make its way into learning feeds.  

First, the content must have learning outcomes.  So, for example, if you want to bring in some of your YouTube videos and organize them through your Knoitall classroom, you will need to identify the learning outcomes that each video provides.  In this way your followers can easily weave through the content in their own feeds and focus on those items that provide the specific learning outcomes they may be seeking that day or that week.

Second, the content must be assigned an age range.  Our site supports learners from cradle to grave, and we want to make sure that all are presented with content that is appropriate for their age.  We provide a safe place for both kids and adults to learn more about the topics of interest to them.  We have created a community that is used by school teachers, bloggers, experts, non profits and some of your favorite brands.  

How Followers Follow You is Different

Anyone can follow you, but what they learn from you is defined by the topics they choose to follow.  So, unlike other social networks, your posts must fulfill three requirements to show up in your followers' feeds:

  1. They must elect to follow you
  2. The content you post must be tagged to one of their learning interests
  3. The content must be tagged to the user's age (child, pre-teen, teen, adult)

These requirements give you the freedom to share content on multiple topics that you may be passionate about, knowing that only those items that are tagged to a topic of interest to one of your followers will show up in their feed.

How Content is Treated and Delivered to the Feed is Different

Although there are variations to the rule, most social networks prioritize the content delivered to the feed based on when it was created, and they use a LIFO algorithm (Last In First Out).  This assures that the most current content is delivered into your feed first so that you always have a current feed.  So, within the context of most social networks, if I decide to follow you today, I'm only going to see your content in my feed if it was created today or at some point in the future.  Feeds don't look to the past for content, they look to the future.

Although Knoitall deploys a component of this approach, we fold in learning pathways, which define the order in which content was intended to be delivered by its creator.  So, if you create a learning pathway and tag 10 existing items to be delivered as part of that pathway, those 10 items will be delivered into your followers' feeds in the order they were placed into the pathway.

And there's more.  We treat pathways as new content for all of your future followers.  What this means is that, when a new follower chooses to follow you, we will begin to deliver your previously created pathways into that learner's feed as if they were new content...each listing showing up in the learner's feed in the order it was created.

You can sell through Knoitall

Finally, we give you the ability to create learning content that you share with others, and learning content that you SELL to others.  You can do this by creating an offer to tutor or advise your followers one-on-one, or deliver a face-to-face class or webinar.  These items are delivered directly into your followers' feeds alongside the free learning content.  

I hope this helps to differentiate Knoitall for you from the other social networks available to you and your followers.  

Thank you for being part of our community.

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  1. Learn how to create a podcast
Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Teen, Adult

This looks like a great free video course on how to create a podcast

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  1. Learn the fundamentals of SEO
Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Teen, Adult

This is a cool "free" course I found to help others learn SEO.  It looks like it covers the fundamentals with input from folks who work in SEO every day.  A good, practical SEO guide.

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  1. Learn AI from the co-founder of Coursera
  2. What is artificial intelligence?
  3. What are some of the ways AI can be used?
Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Pre-teen, Teen, Adult

This is a new course offered through Coursera for those interested in an introduction to artificial intelligence.  

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  1. The value of social media marketing
  2. The benefits of online marketing
  3. How to get the most from your marketing
  4. Skills you need for job roles like social media manager, digital marketing manager and brand ambassador
Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Pre-teen, Teen, Adult

This is a new course offered for free through Facebook.

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Competencies

  • Arts & Crafts: Landscape & Landscape Architecture
  • Business: Social Media
  • Computers & Software: Artificial Intelligence
  • Education: Counseling
  • Education: Teaching & Curriculum
  • Education: Knoitall
  • English, Literature & Writing: Writing, Blogging, Journaling & Getting Published
  • Home & Garden: Gardening
  • Sports & Leisure: Running, Cross Country & Marathon Training
  • Computers & Software: Social Media
  • Business: Marketing: Advertising
  • Education: Customer Education
  • Arts & Crafts: Painting
  • Business: Learning & Development
  • Business: Venture Capital
  • Business: Small Business & Entrepreneurship
  • Business: Financial Management & Budgets
  • Business: Finance: Financial Systems, Processes & Technology
  • Business: Sales & Selling: Ecommerce
  • Arts & Crafts: Scrapbooking
  • Business: Management & Leadership
  • Business: Marketing: Market Research
  • Computers & Software: Search Engine Optimization & SEO
  • Computers & Software: Facebook

Locations

Followers

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