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Harriet Schock School of Songwriting

Harriet Schock wrote the words and music to the Grammy-nominated #1 hit, “Ain’t No Way To Treat A Lady” plus many songs for other artists, TV shows and films. She co-wrote the theme for “Jakers! The Adventures of Piggley Winks,” currently showing in 30 countries. She and her band were featured in Henry Jaglom’s film “Irene In Time” performing 4 of Harriet’s songs. She also scored three other Jaglom films and starred in “Just 45 Minutes from Broadway.“ Jaglom’s recent film, “The M Word,” features Harriet’s song “Bein’ a Girl,” performed on camera at the end of the film. Karen Black wrote the play, “Missouri Waltz,” around five of Harriet’s songs, which ran for 6 weeks at the Blank Theatre in Hollywood as well as in Macon, Georgia. In 2007, Los Angeles Women in Music honored Harriet with their Career Achievement and Industry Contribution award. Harriet teaches songwriting privately, in classes and a popular online course by private email.

Educational Offerings

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Learn the ingredients of a great song

Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Pre-teen, Teen, Adult

This is a video I made last year for Songcamp called:

The 4 often overlooked ingredients in a great song.

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Learn how to balance your work life with your "soul" life

Learn the importance of feeding your creative desires

Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Pre-teen, Teen, Adult

It’s almost a joke line, “Don’t give up your day job.” It usually means “Whatever you’re trying to do, you’re not good enough at it to make a living, so don’t give up your day job.” First of all, Charles Bukowski kept his day job at the post office even after he was making money as a poet and highly respected. I often tell my songwriting students, there is a case to be made for day jobs, like having money for demos, not having to give up your publishing, not having to make creative compromises, etc. And just because someone keeps his day job, that doesn’t mean he’s not good enough at a creative endeavor. He could just be smart. But this article isn’t about how keeping your day job could benefit your career. It’s about the converse of that.

I believe it’s important FOR your day job, as well as the rest of your life, not to give up your art and your dreams. I’ve had a number of students tell me that they wanted to write songs but their day job required so much time that between work and their families, they gave up the writing. Of course, that usually happened ten years ago—during which time they aged about twenty years. They then come dragging in knowing there’s something terribly wrong and wondering if it could be a good idea to start writing songs again. Not only is it a good idea, they should have never stopped in the first place. As I said in my article (now a chapter in my book), “Writing In Space,” songs are not written in time but in space, so you can’t use the old excuse that you have no time. That won’t fly.

Your art fuels your soul which is what’s running the show. Without your creative life, your day job will suffer, your family will suffer, all because your soul is not being fed. Of course, not everyone needs to write songs. Some people go through life perfectly happy with day jobs and families and they never write a song. But these people are not songwriters. Songwriters need to write songs. And if they don’t, they’ll have hell to pay. You know this if you’re an artist of any kind and have abandoned your art. It takes a toll on your soul, and thereafter, everything else. It’s like removing the generator from your car and still expecting the battery to work endlessly. Where are you going to get the energy to do all the work your day job requires if you have cut off your power supply? Of course, some people will make anything they do creative and that will fuel their lives. But I’ve seen so many songwriting students come in on their last leg and the minute they start creating again, they become enthusiastic (the Greek word for spirit is similar to the word for enthusiasm). Without enthusiasm, it’s all just drudgery. Your art can give you that enthusiasm, or in some cases, give you back your enthusiasm—for life, for getting out of bed in the morning, even for your day job. After all, you have to get from home to the workplace. And isn’t that drive more fun when you’re thinking about your new song on the way?

The good news is that it doesn’t really matter how long a time has elapsed for the writer, the flame never really goes out. The embers of creativity can be fanned into a full-fledged fire. Of course, the skills may need some work, but the desire will still be there. All that’s needed is some real hope, not even of success, but just hope that the process can continue. You can write a song and someone will listen. You may not realize how many other rooms in your life will be warmed by that fire and it’s not important that you know. But having seen so many writers get the fire back after so long a time away from writing, I can speak with certainty, that much good will come of it.

Nik Venet, the legendary record producer, used to tell his classes “If you drive a cab and write songs, then you’re a songwriter. Driving a cab is your hobby.” Whether you subscribe to that point of view or not, there is truth to be learned from it. If you respect songwriting as your chief endeavor, then you will see that it feeds the other areas of your life, like your day job.

I have a student who is a wonderful songwriter/singer. She’s also an excellent accountant. But I believe that if she were not also a songwriter, she’d have pulled her hair out long ago from looking at so many numbers. She’s a calm, cool, collected comptroller. Probably in the back of her mind at all times is a song. And that song keeps her smiling, keeps the engine running. Her boss is happy. She’s happy. The numbers add up. Everybody wins.

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Finding the line between writing great music and writing music that sells

Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Teen, Adult
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There are signature sounds to certain songwriters. Learn the various ways melodies are written.

Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Adult

This is a blog post I wrote to share my thoughts on the "fingerprints" each songwriter has, and how to develop your own style over time.

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Learn the importance (or not) of the chorus in song writing

Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Adult

This is a blog post I wrote to address the unwarranted attention that the chorus can take in a song writer's mind.  Some songs don't need a traditional chorus, and this post addresses some of the instances where that is the case.

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Communication – is your song going to convince your “jury of listeners”?

Exposition with finesse - Is the necessary backstory presented subtly enough to be invisible?

Rhythm of the melody – is it different in each section and interesting in itself?

Smart Devices – are you using some of the clever tricks that great songwriters use to enchant the listener?

Free Resource (Video, Article, Pod Cast or Other)
Pre-teen, Teen, Adult

Watch this video and hear all about it: Harriet Schock on the 4 ingredients

I started teaching songwriting in 1986. I have a new class that starts Tuesday, April 3, and there's a spot waiting for you! Or, I can coach you privately if you prefer. Contact me immediately to get started!

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Learn some of the key ingredients to write a "hit" song

Gain information about the journey of songwriters in the modern music business world

$100.00
1 session(s)  3 Hours
Face-to-Face - Class or Seminar
Teen, Adult

Get feedback on your "wanna-be-hit" songs and vital information about what it takes to be a professional songwriter in 2018

Calling all songwriters: you are invited to join acclaimed hit songwriters/performers/producers/business peeps Harriet Schock and Jud Friedman for an intimate, fun and educational night of song critiquing and "real world" information about the journey of songwriters in the modern music business world.

Each writer will have 15 minutes to play one or two songs max and get individual feedback and suggestions from Harriet and Jud. Please be prepared to tell us what your intended purpose is for the song and/or demo; e.g. to pitch to a singer, to pitch to film and TV, for yourself to perform as an artist, or otherwise.

Light refreshments will be provided.

For more information and to sign up, please contact Harriet at harrietschock@earthlink.net or Jud at jud@judfriedmanmusic.com

JUD FRIEDMAN is a multiple Grammy, Oscar and Golden Globe nominated songwriter/producer of hits including RUN TO YOU by Whitney Houston from “The Bodyguard” film and musical; FOR THE FIRST TIME by Kenny Loggins, from "One Fine Day"; I DON’T HAVE THE HEART by James Ingram (#1 on the Billboard Hot 100); and numerous other songs recorded by artists such as Barbra Streisand, Ray Charles, Chaka Khan, Rod Stewart, Ray Charles, Oleta Adams, Toni Braxton, Leann Rimes, Tina Turner and many more. www.judfriedmanmusic.com

Jud recently built launched qWaqq, a unique streaming app which allows music lovers to discover the great unreleased songs of the songwriters behind their favorite hits and artists, which are unavailable on other streaming sites: https://qwaqq.com, App Store https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/id1126378908.

HARRIET SCHOCK wrote the words and music to the Grammy-nominated #1 hit, "Ain't No Way To Treat A Lady" plus many songs for other artists, TV shows and films, including “The New Adventures of Pippi Longstocking,” and PBS children’s series, “Jakers, the Adventures of Piggley Winks” that airs in over 30 countries. Her songs have been recorded by Helen Reddy, Johnny Mathis, Smokey Robinson, Manfred Mann, Roberta Flack, Lee Greenwood, Carl Anderson, Nancy Wilson, The Partridge Family, The Little Mermaid and many others. As a solo artist, she has released seven albums. She has provided songs/score for 4 Henry Jaglom films, wrote the book Becoming Remarkable for Songwriters and Those who Love Songs and teaches songwriting in L.A. and online around the world. For six years, she has hosted the singer/songwriter showcase SNAP (Sunday Night at the Pavilion). www.harrietschock.com.

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$ 100.00

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Competencies

  • Dance, Drama & Music: Song Writing

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